The Key to Remaining Independent

One out of every four older adults 65 years and older adults falls annually. 

Falls are the # 1 reason older adults lose their independence. 
To remain independent with a high quality of life the following are important: 

  1. Don't get sick
  2. Avoid frailty
  3. Don't fall
  4. Don't get injured 

 

Are You At Risk For Falling and Injury?

Have you or a loved one experienced a stumble, trip, a fall or near fall with or without injury?

Have difficulty walking or trouble navigating through the home, or walking while holding onto furniture?

Are you experiencing dizziness when getting up from bed or chair, dizziness bending over and turning, have stiff muscles or joints, avoiding activities, sits or lies down often? 

​When your answer is YESimmediate intervention is necessary, you have no time to waste.

 

Improving Your Odds

Changing your odds by eliminating risk factors for falling and reducing the total number of fall risk factors maybe the single one thing you need do to stay independent.

Balance and mobility training to prevent and reduce falls is available and suitable for the following older adults:​

  • The older adult just beginning to experience balance problems
  • The older adult with balance and mobility problems without a history of falling
  • The older adult with balance and mobility problems with a history of falling with and without injuries


The GOOD NEWS is that most falls are preventable with the appropriate and timely intervention.

  • Falls are not an inevitable part of aging
  • Falls are not a normal part of aging
  • The aging process by itself does not cause someone to fall

Screen, Assess, Intervene

Fall Risk Screening can determine fall risk in an individual and modifiable fall risk factors. Assessment of one's balance and mobility can determine possible balance impairments. Interventions such as restoring balance and mobility strength and as stability, identifying modifiable home fall risk hazards are tailored to each client and are adapted throughout the age-span. 

 

We utilize the standardized STEADI-CDC fall risk screen and use the most appropriate tools for assessing balance, mobility, and strength, and then use the results to guide the development of functional progressive balance and mobility training programs. 

 

There are many reasons why older adults have balance problems or why falls occur. That is the reason why exercise programs for balance and mobility must specifically address the balance disorder in order to provide desired results.

 

Getting Started:

  1. Contact Fitness & Function, we answer your questions and want to learn about your challenges, needs, preferences and wellness goal.
  2. For in-home personal training a Medical Release for Exercise from health care provider will be obtained. We ask you to complete Health Medical History and registration. When you choose to begin with physical therapy the PT will coordinate care with you and your doctor.
  3. Schedule first session for us to obtain vital signs and baseline measurements, and conduct a balance and mobility assessment. 
  4. Schedule training sessions for the month

Creating Your Best Retirement Years

Enjoying your retirement for many years to come does not just happen. The best retirement is an active one, feeling strong, healthy and energetic to advanced old age. We can slow the aging process by adopting an early and regular commitment to exercise, to improve strength, balance, overall conditioning and well-being.

 

Optimal health, function and fitness is created with daily physical activity, regular exercise, consuming healthy foods that prevent disease, and which is called “Lifestyle Medicine”.

and this involves the use of evidence-based lifestyle therapeutic approaches, such as a predominantly whole food, plant-based diet, regular physical activity, adequate sleep, stress management, avoidance of risky substance use, and other non-drug modalities, to prevent, treat, and, oftentimes, reverse the lifestyle-related, chronic disease that's all too prevalent. 

 

The good news is that 80% or more of all healthcare spending in the U.S. is tied to the treatment of conditions rooted in poor lifestyle choices. Chronic diseases and conditions—such as hypertension, heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis, multiple types of cancer—are among the most common, costly and preventable of all health conditions.

 

Like Your Life Depends On It

Making 2019 your best year ever and get on the path to optimal aging, lifelong well-being, and long-term Independence with a high quality of life. Lifestyle is Medicine; remember that you have a choice, research shows that you can prevent and reverse lifestyle-related chronic disease. If you fed up with having high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, sick of tired of the increasing medications that keep you sick and dependent, than it is time to make a change, not a small change, but a drastic lifestyle change that gets your health, function and fitness moving in the right direction. Take the true health initiative http://www.truehealthinitiative.org and realize that it’s time to live like your health depends on it.

 

Six Guiding True Health Initiative principles

 

1. A diet comprised mostly of minimally processed, generally plant-predominant foods in balanced combinations (e.g., traditional diets of certain Mediterranean populations, certain Asian populations).

An optimal diet exerts far-ranging effects on the body and stands to reduce the risk of all chronic disease. Your diet affects your health and environment.

 

2. Routine physical activity at moderate intensity, frequency, and duration.

Physical activity is associated with weight control, reduced inflammation, enhanced immune function, and reduced cancer risk specifically.

 

3. The avoidance of toxins, particularly tobacco and excess alcohol

 

4. Sleep adequate in both quality and quantity.

The quality and quantity of sleep has profound effects on psychology, immunology, and neurology.

 

5. The effective mitigation of psychological stress.

Undue stress can contribute to hormonal imbalances and inflammation that propagate cancer.

 

6. The cultivation of meaningful, supportive relationships and strong social bonds.

Clinical trials demonstrate that those with loving relationships are far less vulnerable to chronic disease and death than those without.

 

The emerging science of epigenetics–changes in gene expression–shows that 80% of how we age is related to our behavior and the choices we make every day regarding food, sleep, exercise and how we manage stress all have a profound impact on how we feel and function.

 

Creating and Recreating a Body that Functions Efficiently

While aging is a fact of life, the good news is that we can repair our DNA and rejuvenate our body’s cells through healthy habits and lifestyle choices.  Studies show that the incidence of chronic diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, could be reduced by as much as 80% by Lifestyle Medicine with exercise as a key component. We can slow the aging process by adopting an early and regular commitment to exercise, to improve strength, balance, overall conditioning and well-being. It is time to take back what you have lost over the years.

 

Exercise as Medicine

The benefits of regular physical exercise can be more powerful than any pill, procedure or surgical intervention. Physical fitness has an unparalleled optimizing effect on health by reducing or reversing the risk of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, hypertension, depression and anxiety. A regular exercise program boosts immunity and cognitive function, strengthens bones and joints and reduces the risks of falls, all with the benefit of increased well-being and self-esteem. 

 

The medical literature reports that regularly practiced exercise (cardio, strength training, flexibility and balance) is the best way to delay and reverse the negative consequences of aging. Research has shown that a person’s degree of physical fitness is an excellent predictor of life expectancy and quality of life. A consistent commitment to exercise that includes frequent activity throughout the day, in combination with a whole-foods, plant-based diet, is the best medicine available to promote healthy and happy aging.

 

The way to age well and stay independent to advanced 90+ years of age is to make sure you don’t get sick, don’t get injured, don’t get frail and don’t fall. We want you to age well, free from the problems caused by deconditioning and inactivity. 

 

Hire Only The Best to Help You Become Your Best

When you have a medical condition and take medication you want to consult a knowledgeable physician who truly supports your mission to improve health by making lifestyle choices and avoid those who just want to prescribe you pills. A supportive physician can help you reduce dependency on medication and eliminate medication as you transition into a more efficiently functioning body. Enlist a health coach and/or personal trainer to help you make changes to your daily nutrient intake, safe guidelines on technique, timing and on how best to develop and advance your program to maximize results and prevent injury. 

 

True Health Initiative

You personal True Health Initiative places you on the path that improve and maintain your blood vessels, optimizes brain and heart function, strengthens your muscles and bones, improving blood pressure, reduces stress on your heart, better oxygen delivery to your brain to combat and prevent dementia and Alzheimer’s, reduce body weight and body fat helping you feel good and look good.

 

Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired?

If you are sick and tired of being sick and tired and if you have been taking increasing number and dosage of medications for those common chronic medical conditions it’s time to start living like your health depends on it, ask us how you can get started. info@fitnessandfunction.com

 

Staying well During the Holidays and Beyond

Your health does not take a break during the holidays, and health-full nutrition, daily physical activity and exercise are still required for your body to function at an optimum level and to make it through the holidays without significant weight gain, and for maintaining our health, function and fitness.
 
Nutrition
Choose real food, especially whole food plant based, and avoid manufactured foods loaded with sugar, sodium, saturated and hydrogenated fats and ingredients you cannot even pronounce. Pay attention to portion sizes and calories, and read the labels.
 
Stay hydrated
Dry weather, furnaces are back on and the air is dry in the home which increases the risk for dehydration. Signs of dehydration are headache, dizziness, low blood pressure, stiff muscles and joints, slowing down digestion, and increased risk for falling. In addition to all those sweet and alcohol drinks, make sure to keep up with your water intake. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine determined that an adequate daily fluid intake is:
About 15.5 cups (3.7 liters) of fluids for men
About 11.5 cups (2.7 liters) of fluids a day for women
 
The New Exercise Recommendations
Exercise is essential for good health and function, boost your mood, sharpens your focus, reduces your stress, and improves your sleep. Important for older adults is that physical activity can help you stay independent as you age, reduce symptoms of arthritis, anxiety, and depression, and help keep diabetes and high blood pressure under control.
 
 
Key Guidelines for Adultsƒ
Adults should move more and sit less throughout the day. Some physical activity is better than none. Adults who sit less and do any amount of moderate-to- vigorous physical activity gain some health benefits.ƒ For substantial health benefits, adults should do at least 150 minutes (2 hours and 30 minutes) to 300 minutes (5 hours) a week of moderate-intensity, or 75 minutes (1 hour and 15 minutes) to 150 minutes (2 hours and 30 minutes) a week of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity, or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic activity. Preferably, aerobic activity should be spread throughout the week.ƒ Additional health benefits are gained by engaging in physical activity beyond the equivalent of 300 minutes (5 hours) of moderate-intensity physical activity a week.ƒ Adults should also do muscle-strengthening activities of moderate or greater intensity and that involve all major muscle groups on 2 or more days a week, as these activities provide additional health benefits.
 
Key Guidelines for Older Adults
The key guidelines for adults also apply to older adults. In addition, the following key guidelines are just for older adults:ƒ As part of their weekly physical activity, older adults should do multicomponent physical activity that includes balance training as well as aerobic and muscle- strengthening activities.ƒ Older adults should determine their level of effort for physical activity relative to their level of fitness.ƒ Older adults with chronic conditions should understand whether and how their conditions affect their ability to do regular physical activity safely.ƒ When older adults cannot do 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity a week because of chronic conditions, they should be as physically active as their abilities and conditions allow.
 
 
Visit my website for more information or call me to find out how you can begin an in-home personal training program. www.fitnessandfunction.com
 

Death rates from unintentional falls among adults aged ≥ 65 years increased 110%

For men the death rates were higher than women.  

Nonfatal fall injuries are among the most costly health conditions among people 65 years and older, and falls are the number 1 reason why older adults loose independence.

 

Many fall risk factors are modifiable 

Potentially modifiable risk factors for falling are; poor balance, mobility problems, impaired vision, and insufficient vitamin D. Contributing factors to falls include side effects of specific medication and the presence of home hazards. With each additional risk factor and having multiple risk factors the risk for falling increases such as an older adult with poor balance and impaired vision encounters a tripping hazard.

 

Most falls, death rate from falls and loss of independence due to falls being preventable, it is clear that too many older adults wait far too long before getting help. There are effective strategies that can be implemented to reduce risk factors for falling.

 

Screen, Assess, Intervene

Screening for fall risk, then assess to identify modifiable risk factors such as (1) poor balance, (2) mobility problems, (3) Medication side effects linked to falls, (4) vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency, (5) problems with vision, (6) poor depth perception or use of multifocal eyewear, (7) home hazards for falling. 

 

Tailored Falls Prevention Strategies
Falls are not a normal part of aging, falls are not an inevitable part of aging, and the aging process by itself does not cause someone to fall. For active, successful aging it is essential older adults reduce their risk factors for falling and thereby can extend quality and quantity of life. 

 

Your health/fitness professional play an important role in identifying modifiable risk factors for falling. After conducting a fall risk screen we may refer you to your health care provider and/or to refer to specialist for uncorrected vision problems such as optometrist or ophthalmologist, your pharmacists for a side effect of medication that increase fall risk review. To restore, maintain balance and mobility and maximize your wellness potential incorporating community based balance and mobility programs, in-home privately tailored falls prevention, balance and mobility programs, physical therapists and occupational therapists for effective intervention.

 

Start your falls prevention action plan

Begin to complete the Stay Independent Questionnaire in the comfort of you home. Be truthful, realistic and honest completing the questionnaire, your life or quality of life may depend on it. 

 

Experiencing a stumble, trip, near fall, slight unsteadiness or unusual dizziness These disturbances should be taken serious because this often leads to another fall with or without injury. The best time to begin a balance and mobility specific exercise program is when you are beginning to experience balance problems. Expert help is available. Hire a Certified Balance and Mobility Specialist who is trained to conduct a fall risk screen and perform the appropriate assessment to identify what causes you to lose balance. He/she can provide you or your personal trainer with information appropriate for exercise program development and training aimed to improve balance, stability, strength, and mobility. We screen, assess, and intervene to reduce fall risk by providing our older clients with individually tailored interventions. 

 

A fall without injury

Sliding of the bed or chair, falling without injury are a serious sign that you need to take action. Immediate intervention is required if you want to remain independent and want to reduce and/or prevent recurrent falls. If you currently participate in regular exercise program it is time to determine if this exercise program contains sufficient challenge to keep you on your feet while aging. Just because a class is fun does not make it beneficial for balance and mobility. A Certified Balance and Mobility Specialist can perform assessments to determine possible balance impairments and design an exercise program accordingly. Once you have regained balance skills, the key is to retain these skills with an exercise program that systematically rotates exercises of the various multi-sensory and multi-dimensional balance challenges so that you maintain your skills and can slow down age-related declines in balance and functional health.

 

Multiple falls without injury or a fall(s) with injury

Repeated falls and experiencing an injury with a fall, a slight bruise, doctor visit or emergency room. If you happen to survive this fall, you have no time to wasteImmediate intervention is needed. The next fall may be deadly or cost you your independence. Consult your healthcare provider to conduct Multifactorial Fall Risk Assessment to determine if there are medical reasons why you have been falling and request a referral for Physical Therapy to help you restore function to a level where you are no longer at high fall risk. Then you can transition to a Balance and Mobility Specialist/Personal Trainer to retain these skills and progress you to a higher level of functional fitness or to a level where you can retain functional independence. Your balance and mobility specialist/trainer systematically rotates exercises of the various multi-sensory and multi-dimensional balance challenges so that you can maintain your skills and to slow down age-related declines in balance and functional health.

 

Applying effective strategies

Fitness & Function screens, assesses, and intervenes to reduce fall risk by giving our older adults tailored interventions from the comfort of their home.

The cost for waiting too long to get help is not just financially expensive, it leads to a reduced quality of life, possibly having to give up independence or premature death.

 

From 1999 to 2016, age-adjusted death rates from unintentional falls among adults aged ≥ 65 years increased 110%. Among men aged ≥ 65 years, the age-adjusted death rate increased 89% in 2016. For women aged ≥ 65 years, the rate increased 122% in 2016. 

live your life to the fullest with full function for as long as possible.

 

Falls prevention strategies throughout the aging process

By the time you have experienced a fall with or without injury, and lucky enough to survive the fall, quality of life has probably diminished already. Fall prevention intervention programs need periodically be re-evaluated. I recommend a fall risk screen every three months unless medical status changes, and reassessment of balance and mobility every 6 months. With fall risk increasing as we age, a continuum of appropriate exercises and strategies needs to be in place to identify the fall risk factors and prevent falls throughout the aging process. 

 

By Jacqueline Sinke; Certified FallProof Balance and Mobility Specialist, Stepping On Certified, ACSM EP-C, ACSM CET, ACE CMES, ACE HC, ACE CPT, Delay The Disease Parkinson's Exercise Certified

Healthy Aging and Longevity

 

To what age would you like to live, 70, 80, 90, or 100+?  May be a better question is: To what age would like like to stay independent, with strength, stamina and balance to tackle everyday activities and then some, age 70, 80, 90, or a 100+?

 

Life expectancy in the United. States is 78.8 years on average, although women still outlive men by about five years. The Journal on Active Aging May/June  2018 issue states that a woman who already has reached the age of 75 can expect to live to 88 and a man to 86.2 years. The quantity of life and quality of life in which you spend the last decade of life depends a lot on how your treat yourself the years leading up to this time. 

 

Research shows that the best way that aging adults can assure a better and possibly high quality of life is by taking an active role in disease and injury prevention. By reducing the amount of time that we are sick and/or disabled at the end of life we compress morbidity and can remain living fully functional well up to the last week or weeks of our lives. 

 

Several years ago I received a phone call from a son telling me that his mother had passed away the night before. He called to thank me. He explained that she attended one of my exercise training classes I was teaching at that time, exercises that allowed her to stay independent and live an active lifestyle. She took my class term after term, year after year. He said that she was always talking about the class and how much she enjoyed being there. He thanked me for giving her the chance to remain physically active to the very last day of her life. She made it to age 92 and lived independent in her own home in Beaverton, made her own clothes, learned painting with oil and watercolor, participated in many community activities and lived actively. She simply just went to sleep that night and never woke up. Tears welled up in my eyes after learning how much she valued the class I was teaching and learning that she enjoyed a high quality of life and truly lived life to the fullest which was her most important goal. 

 

The point I want to make by sharing this story is, that it is never too late to practice prevention and extending both quality and quantity of life. Genetics have a lot to do with this, however ‘epigenetics’  maybe more important than our genes which refers to the alterations in our genes and their expression due to lifestyle and environmental factors, which include fitness, diet, weight, sleep, mood, social interaction, alcohol consumption and other habits. These factors lead to alterations in our genes that also affect longevity.

Dr. Fries postulated about 40 years ago: The healthiest among us not only have the longest life, but also spend the shortest time being sick.

 

Our health and fitness professionals work with many a older adults to restore function, optimize health, fitness and performance through specific exercise and physical activity and many of these seniors have received regular and consistent training10 years or more twice to three times per week. Despite some serious health issues (such as strokes, TIA’s, stage 4 cancer and various cancer treatments) they were able to regain function and resume a life of independence. Several of these clients were close to losing independence when they started their personalized exercise program. Now those clients moved from their sixties to their seventies, those in their seventies are now eighty something and we have several clients at the advanced age of 92, 93, 97 and 98 who up to this day reside in their own home in the community and who are living proof that life can be improved and extended.

 

According to the late Dr. Robert Butler MD, there are several characteristics or behaviors that promote healthy aging. Some of these are:

 

  • Mental exercise to preserve brainpower
  • Muscle strengthening to keep mobile
  • A good night sleep or taking a nap during the day
  • Staying slender by eating a healthy diet
  • Having strong social ties and love in one’s life
  • Receiving good medical care

 

Additional recommendations for longer lasting quality of life

 

  • Emphasis on a plant-based diet with occasional consumption of meat, with lots of high fiber foods, like whole grains, beans, nuts, yams
  • Avoid overeating. Be mindful of the “hara hachi bu” principle of only eating to 80% full. Eating food of lower calorie density(e.g. More vegetables, beans, berries, fish, high fibers, and nuts). Portion sizes should shrink as we age.
  • Stay physically active. Not necessarily having to go to the gym everyday, but instead just moving more in daily life, functional exercise such as gardening, cleaning, carrying groceries and perform structured exercise to restore function, improve health and optimize your wellness potential.
  • Enjoy and be mindful, happiness is a critical component of health and disease prevention.

 

Source: the Journal of Active aging and me Jacqueline Sinke, my personal experience as a health fitness professional.

Delay The Disease: The # 1 Parkinson's Exercise Program

Fitness & Function has been offering the Delay The Disease # 1 Parkinson’s Exercise program for about a year. As the number of people being diagnosed with Parkinson’s increases, I as a fitness professional am excited to offer the # 1 Parkinson's Exerise Program that fights the symptoms of Parkinson's.  I am excited to let you know that several of my team members also received certification in 'Delay The Disease".  

Delay The Disease was developed at OhioHealth and reduces the symptoms of Parkinson's Disease. We provide personal training and private physical therapy in the reduction of Parkinson's symptoms, optimize physical function and fitness and help clients stay independent and functionally mobile longer. We work with clients in beginning to advanced stages of Parkinsons's Disease.

 

Most people with Parkinson's Disease (PD) are older adults and may have additional medical conditions (e.g. diabetes, heart disease, balance problems, degenerative joint disease, heart diseaase, hypertension, arthritis etc.), for whom an interdisciplinary exercise training and wellness program must be created to provide a safe and effective exercise experience and beneficial to all medical conditons.

 

The exercise program will be modified throughout the aging and disease process(es) to provide maximal benefit. Delay the Disease Exercise Program is individualized and aimed to help our clients with PD:

  • Move about with ease and confidence in a crowd
  • Get out of bed or rise from a chair independently
  • Improve handwriting
  • Dress independently
  • Diminish worry that stiffness, slow steps and other symptoms are obvious
  • Regain a sense of moving with normality Delayed The Disease Exercise like most exercise training programs needs to be sustained and modified throughout the aging process and disease progression to maintain maximal benefits

Let me know how I can help you.

INNOVATIONS IN AGING A DEFENSE PLAN FOR OLDER ADULTS

INNOVATIONS IN AGING recently published the article 'Implementing STEADI in Academic Primary Care (OHSU) to Address Older Adult Fall Risk'. 

 

The STEADI is an important falls screening tool that is recommended by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) to healthcare providers and is benefiial to fitness professionals in determining fall risk in senior clients and the outcome of the screening is essential in the development of an effective and beneficial exercise program that allow older adult clients to stay functionally healthy and independent.

 

Fitness & Function has been using the STEADI Fall Risk Screening as a major defense plan for their older adults clients who wish to remain independent while aging for at least 4 years or more. This article shows that timely intervention can prevent a lot of pain and despair in the aging population when used appropriately. 
 

Falls are the leading cause of injury-related deaths in older adults.Objectives include describing implementation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths, and Injuries (STEADI) initiative to help primary care providers (PCPs) identify and manage fall risk, and comparing a 12-item and a 3-item fall screening questionnaire. 

 

When any of our clients is identified as being at high fall risk, a falls Intervention program is designed specifically tailored to target the balance disorder. Our highly specialized personal trainers and physical therapists provide in-home fall risk intervention, balance and mobility training aimed to help our clients to achieve optimal function to remain independent to advanced 90+ years of age.

 

Read the complete article by following the link below. https://academic.oup.com/innovateage/article/1/2/igx028/4669728

Innovations in Aging, Volume 1, Issue 2, 1 September 2017, igx028, https://doi.org/10.1093/geroni/igx028 Published: 28 November 2017 Article history

Delay the Disease The #1 Parkinson’s Exercise Program

I am excited to let everyone know that I received certification to instruct Delay The Disease The #1 Parkinson’s Exercise Program through OhioHealth. Delay The Disease is a life changing exercise program designed to correct physical challenges resulting from Parkinson’s Disease. Task Specific Practice (goal-based) exercise help with reorganization of neural structures “Practice their Weakness” and help the brain require/relearn take which drives motor and cognitive improvement. Program includes strength training, balance flexibility and aerobic or cardiovascular task specific exercises. Research shows that clients are able to reduce medication in 6-12 months if exercise, however when exercises stop clients regress quickly. Inactivity leads to neurodegeneration. Twice weekly training sessions are best, clients receive optimal results when some of the exercises are practiced daily at home. Contact me for information on how to get started with DelayThe Disease.

Your Wellness Goal While Aging

 

I have incorporated the Senior Fitness Test as a functional fitness assessment with many of my personal training clients and class participants.

Most people do not like to get tested, however most like to stay independent.

As an older adult, this assessment when administered correctly is your TOOL TO LIFELONG INDEPENDENCE.

When your goal is to remain physically independent until ‘late in life’ (defined as 90+ years of age). The appropriate wellness goal to strive for is achieving the ‘FITNESS STANDARD’ which is the MINIMUM level of fitness needed to support functional mobility and physical independence. 

Achieving the Fitness Standard means having the ability to do common everyday activities such as simple housework, climbing steps, lifting and carrying objects, and walking far enough to do your own shopping and errands.

Going beyond the Fitness Standard is something that is achievable by many older adults, some are even OFF THE CHART!

Appropriate and timely assessments can identify areas of weakness that will need attention if declines leading to functional limitations are to be prevented or reduced. (Senior Fitness Test Manual 2nd edition Roberta E. Rikkli and C. Jessie Jones.)

 

BENEFITS of The Senior Fitness Test ASSESSMENT:

1 Can tell you whether your physical capacity on each item ranks in the Above Normal, Normal, or Below Normal categories compared with others of same age and gender.

2 Can tell you whether you have the recommended fitness level for your age to remain functionally independent until late in life - defined as 90+ years of age.

3 By taking the test on a regular basis you can track scores over time and monitor changes in performance.

4 Identify areas of weakness that will need attention if declines leading to functional limitations are to be prevented or reduced.

 

FITNESS STANDARD 

The appropriate wellness goal to strive for when you want to remain physically independent until late in life (90+ years of age)

 

                       AGE GROUPS

TEST

60-64

65-69

70-74

75-79

80-84

85-89

90-94

CHAIR STAND

(# in 30 seconds)

Women

15

15

14

13

12

11

9

Men

17

16

15

14

13

11

9

TEST

60-64

65-69

70-74

75-79

80-84

85-89

90-94

ARM CURL

(# in 30 seconds)

Women

17

17

16

15

14

13

11

Men

19

18

17

16

15

13

11

TEST

60-64

65-69

70-74

75-79

80-84

85-89

90-94

2-MINUTE STEP

(# steps in 2 minutes)

Women

97

93

89

84

78

70

60

Men

106

101

95

88

80

81

60

TEST

60-64

65-69

70-74

75-79

80-84

85-89

90-94

8-FOOT UP AND GO

(seconds)

Women

5.0

5.3

5.6

6.0

6.5

7.1

8.0

Men

4.8

5.1

5.5

5.9

6.4

7.1

8.0

 

BENEFIT OF IN-HOME BALANCE TRAINING

When you are experiencing changes in balance or having difficulty with balance and mobility the best place to practice skills and balance exercises is in the home. Since most falls happen in and around the home part of a targeted exercise program is learning to navigate safely through and around the home, build more confidence and prevent a falls or injuries.

 

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) states that one out of every four older adults 65 years and older fall annually and that falls are the main reason older adults lose their independence. Since falls and fall-related injuries happen in the home, older adults benefit more from bringing either the balance and mobility specialist or physical therapist to the home and receive targeted exercises that can be practiced on a daily basis.

 

Exercises at a fitness center or a physical therapy clinic do not often or always directly relate to the home. Additionally, older adults at high risk for falling or physically de-conditioned often do not have the stamina to fully benefit from an exercise or therapy session outside the home because by the time they get there they are already tired. Remembering the exercises for daily at home practice can also pose a problem and exercises are either not performed correctly or not done at all.

 

FALLS INTERVENTION is part of a Balance and Mobility Specialist and Physical Therapist's job. Restoring functional health, strenth, balance, mobility, adding years to our client's life and quality of life to our client's years with targeted exercise programs is our business.